ABOUT  US

Every aspect of the ranch is geared to building young man of integrity. Men that are emotionally whole and morally complete. Like a giant jig saw puzzle, each activity from ranch work to recreational play is structured to help the young man uncover his potential, understand the consequences his choices (past and future), and discover his desire to become, and give him the tools to achieve the man of integrity.

ADDRESS

877-886-9766

 

Location:

38000 S Arivaca Ranch Rd, Arivaca, Arizona 85601

Mailing: 

P.O. Box 547, Arivaca, AZ, 85601

 

admissions@arivacaboysranch.com

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ARIVACA BOYS RANCH 

ABR Program Details

Horses Helping Boys Back to the Right Path

The historic Arivaca Ranch, which has been raising cattle for more than 120 years, is now doing more than getting cattle ready for market.  It’s getting troubled young men from across the U.S. ready for life. And the ranch’s horses are helping do the work.

 

The Arivaca Boys Ranch uses horses as a unique and proven therapeutic tool, along with traditional therapy, to teach young men valuable, principled life lessons. Through a program known as Natural Horsemanship or Equine Therapy, each boy trains a horse assigned just to him. Combined with therapy from licensed counselors, this horse experience is used to help boys learn about themselves, overcome fear, develop self-esteem, and experience firsthand the results of a successful relationship.

 

The founder of the program, Ron Searle says, “It is amazing how powerful the lessons are as each boy interacts with his horse. These experiences translate to his relationships with people and coping with the challenges of life. The transformation can be astounding.”  The program helps each boy learn patience, leadership skills and how to control their emotions while face to face with a stubborn and sometimes rebellious 1200-pound trainee. “The boys can see themselves in the horse. That’s what happens,” Searle says.

The ranch environment also teaches the boys the rewards of hard work and helps them understand the natural consequences of their decisions while continuing their high school education.

 

Boys also have school work everyday, giving them an opportunity to catch up on credits they are behind, often progressing ahead of where they would be in a traditional high school.

 

“We have developed a program that builds on positive experiences while the young men learn to see themselves as the really are, and visualize themselves as they might become,” Searle says. “We believe change comes from the inside, and is not externally motivated.” Searle also explains that in addition to their chores and classes at the ranch, the boys participate in projects that benefit the surrounding area. “What happens at the ranch is a complement to the community,” Searle says.

 

Since its beginning in September, 2008, the Arivaca Boys Ranch has already seen, and continues to see some remarkable successes, as well as some daunting challenges.

Among the success stories is this:  In a recent letter to his family, including his young nieces and nephews, a 17-year old wrote, “It’s my time to figure what I’m going to do with my life and that I need to be mature now and stop acting like a little kid, I’m going to be over 18 by the time I leave here and need to be mature enough to face the real world again but to stand firm with what I believe and what I know is right to do!” 

The ranch environment also teaches the boys the rewards of hard work and helps them understand the natural consequences of their decisions while continuing their high school education.

 

Boys also have school work everyday, giving them an opportunity to catch up on credits they are behind, often progressing ahead of where they would be in a traditional high school.

Horses Helping Boys Back to the Right Path

 

We have developed a program that builds on positive experiences while the young men learn to see themselves as the really are, and visualize themselves as they might become,” Searle says. “We believe change comes from the inside, and is not externally motivated.” Searle also explains that in addition to their chores and classes at the ranch, the boys participate in projects that benefit the surrounding area. “What happens at the ranch is a complement to the community,” Searle says.

 

Since its beginning in September, 2008, the Arivaca Boys Ranch has already seen, and continues to see some remarkable successes, as well as some daunting challenges.

Among the success stories is this:  In a recent letter to his family, including his young nieces and nephews, a 17-year old wrote, “It’s my time to figure what I’m going to do with my life and that I need to be mature now and stop acting like a little kid, I’m going to be over 18 by the time I leave here and need to be mature enough to face the real world again but to stand firm with what I believe and what I know is right to do!” 

 

After a visit to the Ranch a Florida mom wrote, “Seeing my son[ on this visit was like meeting a new person. His smile was the one I remember from when he was a little boy and had a true love of life. To watch him connect with the horses and really have a feeling of accomplishment was thrilling.  Hearing so many of the staff share with us that they genuinely love and care for our son was so comforting and awesome. I could tell it was true because he really loves all the staff out there too.”

These and other success stories are at the heart of the most urgent challenges facing the Arivaca Boys Ranch.  The Ranch can and needs to help more boys than are currently enrolled.  Founder and Director Ron Searle and his partners invested a substantial sum accelerating the rapid evolution from cattle ranch to cattle ranch/boys school.  That investment is paying dividends for the boys, but the program isn’t yet paying its own way.  Searle hopes word of their success spreads to facilitate growth and help keep the program going.

 

Searle also wants to be able to help more boys.  In the current economic climate, tax deductible scholarship donations are needed to keep this program available to families that desperately need help saving their sons.  “I get phone calls from single moms who find out about us on the Internet,” Searle says, “And when I explain the cost of tuition I hear a gasp on the other end of the line.  Their sons need what we offer, but they can’t afford to pay for it, even though we are much less expensive than most programs of this type..  It breaks your heart.”

 

So Searle is recruiting on several fronts.  He’s working to find troubled boys whose families can pay to get their sons the help they need, and he’s looking for donors to the Arivaca Foundation (501c3) to endow scholarships for families who can’t afford tuition for their sons. He also needs investors to provide working capital for growth and offers ownership percentages in the historic 23,000 acre working cattle ranch. “We don’t need a lot of investors; a few key people could make all the difference.  I know we’re on the right track,” Searle says.  “We’re seeing the results we knew we would. We are helping change boys’ lives and blessing families”

For more information call now:

 

Admissions: 877-886-9766

 

Enter your information below to receive a call from a Ranch Specialist

 What we gain from our horse...

Discipline       Courage        Accomplishment     Affection     Trust      Self Esteem     Empathy       Responsibility

 

Below is an except from Zen Mind, Zen Horse by Dr. Alan 

 

Horses provide us with a respite from thinking about ourselves, a chance to escape from the prison of being ourselves by ourselves. Because horses function from the premise of a herd identity, they see relationships as partnerships. They struggle to include us in their concept of a herd —a huge leap considering they are the ultimate prey species and we the über predators. As humans, it is almost inconceivable to us how dramatically different the equine perspective of inclusivity really is. For illustrative purposes, however, imagine waking up on Christmas morning. As you sit down to open your presents, you suddenly discover an 800-pound Bengal tiger seated next to you on the living room sofa. And your response? You are scared out of your wits; you want to scream, run, and scramble for the nearest rifle or tree limb. Imagine instead you strive to include that tiger in a communal context. Rather than flee, you rack your brain to figure out how to hang a stocking on the hearth to make the tiger feel at home, a part of your family. This gives us an inkling of the enormous emotional achievement horses accomplish each day to include us, human predators, as an integral part of their daily working (and emotional) lives. It’s a remarkable spiritual statement about the capacity of the equine heart and soul. As horses derive their very essence from inclusion in a herd, so they struggle to extend that relationship to us as shared being. When a horse is with us, we become a part of his herd. As far as time is concerned, horses live only in the moment. There are no expectations for the future or disappointments from the past to cloud their relationships with us. Without such agendas, horses don’t know how to lie, cheat, or deceive. Horses thus offer us a unique opportunity to see ourselves in “divine mirrors,” reflecting back the chi we give off in our own emotions, to show ourselves in the moment. Horses react to what lies in our hearts, not in our heads. They are not confused by the words we use to lie to ourselves or hide from others. Horses awaken the dormant right half of the human brain. Because the output of our right hemisphere has been largely suppressed since early childhood, it takes time to feel comfortable as a right-sided “we” instead of a left-sided “me.” Eliminating the voice of our egos creates a silence that is at first frightening, but later, we learn, also enthralling. With that silence comes breathtaking power and clarity of thought. As Obi-Wan-Kanobi in Star Wars encourages Luke Skywalker to trust “the Force,” so horses exhort us to trust our intuitive right-brain abilities. Working with horses gives us the opportunity to return to a primal, nonverbal state of awareness. Without the interference of language, we reconnect with the energy shared among all life forms. The connection is palpable and immediate. We learn how to find it, focus it, and let it fly. We explore how to apply chi for the purposes of asking our horses to move naturally, effortlessly, and respectfully wherever we wish them to go. We discover by direct, personal interaction with the horse that we are equal parts body and spirit: half chi, half DNA. Theologist John O’Donahue wrote: “Beyond the veils of language and the noise of activity, the most profound events of our lives take place in those fleeting moments where something else shines through, something that can never be fixed in language, something given as quietly as the gift of your next breath.”

 

 

My goal with the horses is not to beat someone; it’s to win within myself. To do the best job I can do and tomorrow to try to do better. You’ll be working on yourself to accomplish this, not your horse. Every time you step into the round pen with a horse, remind yourself that today you may stand on the threshold of a great new personal discovery. Each horse, in his own way, is ready to coach you. And when your resolution to change —to work on the person you want to become —becomes heartfelt and sincere, then the horse will reveal his next great secret, his next great gift, to you.

 

Ron Searle

Equine Therapy
 What we gain from our horse...

For more information call now:

 

Admissions: 877-886-9766

 

Enter your information below to receive a call from a Ranch Specialist

 
The Arivaca Boys Ranch is located in Arivaca, AZ, about 45 miles outside of Tucson. The ranch serves 40-50 boys who are enrolled over a 10-month period. Classes are accredited and therapy is provided by licensed professionals.  Arivaca Boys Ranch Founder and Director Ron Searle has been teaching teenagers and young adults for more than 29 years.